Number Literacy

Are you interested in developing number literacy in your children?

If so, we currently offer two NUMBER LITERACY publications that will definitely interest you. They are:

  1. NUMBER LITERACY: WHAT’S MY PLACE? WHAT’S MY VALUE?
  2. NUMBER LITERACY: READING AND WRITING THE LANGUAGE OF NUMBERS

Both are designed to be used as a daily supplemental routine that will complement your current math curriculum

NUMBER LITERACY: WHAT’S MY PLACE? WHAT’S MY VALUE?
TEACHING MANUAL AND DEMONSTRATION POSTERS

Whats My Place_Value_Page_01No elementary classroom should be without this practical approach to teaching place value concepts! Teachers across the country have been thrilled with the results! NUMBER LITERACY: WHAT’S MY PLACE? WHAT’S MY VALUE? is a working classroom display that uses visual models and numbers to help your children develop concepts related to place value. Popular for being so very teacher-friendly, this product is a favorite of both progressive and traditional teachers.

When you order this product, you will receive

  • number-literacy-1a teaching manual,
  • blackline masters,
  • and coated posters, which when cut apart become demonstration base-ten pieces.

Visited two or more times weekly, this 10-minute, large-group routine provides repeated opportunities for your children to develop an understanding for the magnitude, flexibility, and beauty of our base-ten place value system.

Primary children use the demonstration pieces to master place value concepts that include

  • rounding,
  • writing numbers in expanded and standard forms,
  • determining whether a number a number is odd or even,
  • arranging numbers on a number line,
  • writing numbers with words only,
  • rearranging digits to form less or greater or values,
  • trading collections,
  • counting backwards and forwards by ones, tens, twos, and fives,
  • adding, subtracting, multiplying and dividing,
  • and halving and doubling numbers.

Because the decimal is moveable, intermediate children demonstrate and master place value concepts using large quantities, (such as thousands and millions), as well as small quantities, (such as, tenths, hundredths, thousandths and ten thousandths). In addition to the concepts listed above for primary children, some other concepts explored by intermediate children include

  • multi-digit multiplication,
  • averaging,
  • doubling and halving,
  • writing numbers using scientific notation,
  • the relationships between fractions and decimals,
  • and division with 1 or 2-digit divisors.

NUMBER LITERACY: READING AND WRITING THE LANGUAGE OF NUMBERS

rwlnYou will find the teaching and learning of number concepts you once considered difficult to master, such as conceptual understanding, basic facts recall, thinking through problem situations, and communicating as mathematicians, will become EASY as concepts are illustrated and discussed. Regardless of the grade level you teach, the versatility of the dot routine makes it equally effective for use with primary and intermediate children alike. English speaking and non-English speaking children benefit equally from this unique approach to modeling number. Meeting the required state standards in any state is easily accomplished by merging this routine with the standards. The mathematics will naturally intensify as your children make connections from simple equations to more difficult counterparts by comparing likenesses and differences, as shown here.

This is a daily, 10-minute routine that you will use to draw upon your children’s ability to think visually. Together you and your children will use grids and dots to help your children develop useful visual images of mathematical concepts and processes. Appropriate for grades K and higher, this large-group routine will help you model the correct use of the written language of mathematics in a constructive, visual context.This 320-page book contains

  • easily understood, practical implementation directions for using this routine across the grade levels,
  • reproducible demonstration blackline masters for creating large-group displays and individual work logs,
  • assessment suggestions,
  • a mathematical reference section of the symbols, operations and notations most often used in elementary classrooms,
  • authentic work samples,
  • suggestions for sharing in the classroom, in the school, in the homes and in the community,
  • and a section devoted to meaningful word problems.

This routine has been a favorite of teachers of elementary children of all ages! Don’t miss out on this opportunity to make the learning of number and number operations easy, fun, and permanent!

Click Here to learn more about our very popular professional development that prepares teachers to implement NUMBER LITERACY: READING AND WRITING THE LANGUAGE OF NUMBERS.